La réforme des prisons sous le gouvernement du MAS est confrontée à de sérieux obstacles. Mais elle a démontré un engagement à affronter les problèmes institutionnels des systèmes judiciaire, policier et carcéral par des initiatives variées. Pour en savoir plus, en anglais, veuillez lire les informations ci-dessous.

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by Linda Farthing for the Andean Information Network

Chronic overcrowding, largely created by an overuse of preventive detention, is endemic in Bolivia’s prison system. Most Bolivians support locking up those accused of crimes until their trials take place, believing that it serves to reduce delinquency .[1] The U.S. imposed Drug Law 1008 further exacerbates the congested conditions.

Institutional weakness of the police and judiciary further violate the rights of incarcerated populations, especially the most vulnerable: indigenous peoples, women and juveniles. Efforts by the current government (MAS – Movimiento al Socialismo) at reform have led to declines in pre-trial detention, female incarceration, and drug-related sentences. Nonetheless, police and judicial corruption, insufficient funding, and continuing public opposition to alternatives to incarceration continue to impede any improvement.

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