Los defensores de los derechos humanos en América Latina finalmente podrán contar con un instrumento jurídicamente vinculante para exigir la rendición de cuentas frente a la falta de respeto de los derechos de las personas mayores. Más información, en inglés, está disponible abajo.

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by Gabriela B. de Luca

A terminal cancer patient is helped off the elevator in the palliative care unit at the El Buen Pastor clinic in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Photo credit: Open Society Foundations © Martin Acosta/Corbi

For years, international conventions have protected the rights of children, women, and people with disabilities—groups recognized as vulnerable to marginalization and human rights violations. Yet the rights of older persons, who are susceptible to the same violations, have been woefully neglected in the human rights framework. Finally, there’s a sign that this is beginning to change. In late June, the Organization of American States released a resolution in which member countries adopted the Inter-American Convention on the Human Rights of Older Persons. It was immediately signed by Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, and Uruguay, and completed in record time, with drafting efforts initiated in 2012 and final text approved in 2015. The convention recognizes that older persons should enjoy all existing human rights and fundamental freedoms on an equal basis, and is based on general principles including dignity, independence, proactivity, autonomy, and full and productive integration into society.

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