The Global Drug Policy Index (GDPI) is an exciting new project supported by the Robert Carr Fund, and led by the Harm Reduction Consortium. Through this project, we will develop, launch and use a new “composite index” that scores and compares national government policies related to the illegal drug market. The GDPI will initially focus on 30 countries, providing each one with a score or ranking to show how much their drug policies compare to the UN System Common Position on Drugs across four dimensions – criminal justice responses, health and harm reduction, access to controlled medicines, and development (while also exploring key issues such as civil society engagement, decriminalisation, proportionality of sentencing, and funding for harm reduction). The GDPI will track both policies and their implementation.

Complete the GDPI Survey for Civil Society Experts!

A major part of the data collection phase for the Index relies on a civil society survey which will truly enable us to assess how drug policies are actually being implemented on the ground.

For this first iteration, the survey is going to cover 30 countries: Afghanistan, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Georgia, Ghana, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, New Zealand, North Macedonia, Norway, Portugal, Russia , Senegal, South Africa, Thailand, Uganda, United Kingdom.

If your country is included in the list, please help us by filling in the survey and share it widely with your civil society colleagues! The deadline for filling in the survey is Friday, 1 October Wednesday, 6 October 2021.


The Harm Reduction Consortium behind the Global Drug Policy Index is comprised of: International Drug Policy Consortium (IDPC); Harm Reduction International (HRI); Youth RISE; Women and Harm Reduction International Network (WHRIN); Middle East and North Africa Harm Reduction Association (MENAHRA); European Network of People who Use Drugs (EuroNPUD); Global Drug Policy Observatory / Swansea University (GDPO); Eurasian Network of People who Use Drugs (ENPUD); Eurasian Harm Reduction Association (EHRA); West Africa Drug Policy Network (WADPN).