By The Colorado Department of Public Safety

In 2013, following the passage of Amendment 64 which allows for the retail sale and possession of  marijuana, the Colorado General Assembly enacted Senate Bill 13‐283. This bill mandated that the Division of Criminal Justice in the Department of Public Safety conduct a study of the impacts of  Amendment 64, particularly as these relate to law enforcement activities. This report seeks to establish  and present the baseline measures for the metrics specified in S.B. 13‐283 (C.R.S. 24‐33.4‐516.)  

The information presented here should be interpreted with caution. The majority of the data should be  considered baseline and preliminary, in large part because data sources vary considerably in terms of  what exists historically. Consequently, it is difficult to draw conclusions about the potential effects of  marijuana legalization and commercialization on public safety, public health, or youth outcomes, and  this may always be the case due to the lack of historical data. Furthermore, the measurement of  available data elements can be affected by very context of marijuana legalization. For example, the  decreasing social stigma regarding marijuana use could lead individuals to be more likely to report use  on surveys and also to health workers in emergency departments and poison control centers, making  marijuana use appear to increase when perhaps it has not. Finally, law enforcement officials and  prosecuting attorneys continue to struggle with enforcement of the complex and sometimes conflicting  marijuana laws that remain. In sum, then, the lack of pre‐commercialization data, the decreasing social  stigma, and challenges to law enforcement combine to make it difficult to translate these preliminary findings into definitive statements of outcomes.